Disco

Visions of John Travolta in a white suit spinning around a dance floor fill our heads when Disco is discussed.  Donna Summer, Gloria Gaynor, the Village People took over from the Rolling Stones and Creedence Clearwater Revival.  The Vietnam "Police Action" was finally over.  Richard Nixon had done his worst.  Gerald Ford was falling down steps for the world to see, and the Disco fad had taken over.  Glamour and  hedonsim took center stage in a glory of polyester and bare chests.  Women left the often shapeless styles of the mid-seventies behind for the clingier, sexier looks of Disco.  Like the flapper fads of the 20's, changes in music helped along changes in fashion.  Women opted for sparkly and slinky fashions which looked good on the dance floor and men dressed for the part in bell bottomed suits and polyester shirts, unbottoned almost to the waist.  Leaving behind the unbecoming casualness of the mid-sixties and early-seventies, people embraced a sort of glamour which is now dismissed as tacky.  Following the disappointments of the previous decade, people--especially young people--sought out ways to indulge themselves.  Sensuality and greed drove the movement into the power hungry power suited eighties.